Who can apply for scholarships?

How can you apply for a scholarship?

Who can apply for scholarships?

Who can apply for scholarships?: Anyone who meets the application requirements can apply. Yes, it’s a ‘Captain Obvious’ answer, but different types of scholarships target different students. Always check if you can apply, if the scholarship application deadlines are up-to-date, and if the scholarship is open to national students, international students, or both.

These are some of the most common application requirements for scholarships:

  • registration or application form
  • letter of motivation or personal essay
  • letter of recommendation
  • letter of acceptance from an academic institution
  • proof of low income, official financial statements
  • proof of extraordinary academic or athletic achievement

How can you apply for a scholarship?

Once you’ve found a study abroad scholarship for which you can apply, start preparing your documents. A typical application process looks like this:

  1. Register for the scholarship, usually by completing an online application form.
  2. Check your inbox to make sure you’ve received the confirmation email.
  3. Write a personal statement or essay. There are enough models on the internet but remember to be original and impress through your unique experiences and ideas.
  4. Get official proof of your academic, athletic, or artistic achievements. Translate the documents if necessary — it usually is.
  5. Or get official proof of your low income or nationality (for region-based scholarships). Again, a translation might be necessary.
  6. Proofread all documents for errors and send them to the scholarship provider.
  7. Submit the acceptance letter from the university (or an official document from the university proving you’ve been accepted). You won’t receive the scholarship without confirming that you will actually begin studies.
  8. Wait for the results. If selected, congratulations, you’re a winner! Go ahead and throw a party but don’t spend all your scholarship money on it. Just kidding; the university or college usually receive the money directly to cover your tuition (or a part of it)